Archive for Change Posts

published in Change, Financial Planning, Gratitude, Inspiration, Money, Prosperity, Quotes by Maryanne | November 13, 2018 | No Comment

Potent Prosperity Principles Quote Cards Now Available!

 

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”

– Benjamin Franklin

Interested in attracting more money, prosperity & abundance into your life?

Check out our brand new quote cards, “Potent Prosperity Principles.”

The goldfish artwork on this set of quote cards was created by Melanie Pope. We chose to use the image of the goldfish because according to Feng Shui, a fish represents wealth and prosperity (the actual word in Chinese for fish also translates to abundance).

There are 30 cards in a set. Each card is 2.5 inches x 2.5 inches. The goldfish is on the front of each card and then on the back of each is a different quote.

 

Here are some more sample quotes: 

“The habit of managing your money is more important than the amount.”

– T. Harv Eker

“There are many roads to prosperity, but one must be taken. Inaction leads to nowhere.”

– Robert Zoellick

“It’s hard to hold on to what we don’t believe we deserve, whether it’s money, love, or success.”

– Sarah Ban Breathnach

To read all 30 quotes, please click here.

Suggested Uses

These powerful prosperity reminders are great to keep for yourself…we suggest you put them in a dish and read one every morning. The sets also make delightful gifts for family & friends.

These quotes are also the perfect thank you gift for clients of financial planners!

Pricing

The quote cards are $7.95 per set (plus $2 shipping) or 2 sets for $14.95 (plus $2 shipping).

To purchase single or 2-packs, please visit the PGP on-line store. 

For larger quantities, please e-mail us for bulk pricing & to order.

Other Quote Card Sets by Pink Gazelle Productions

Wise Owl Wisdom Inspirational Quote Cards

Life After Loss Daily Quote Cards

About Pink Gazelle Productions Inc

We are a Canadian company that was started by Maryanne Pope in 2002. We create literary, theatrical and cinematic works that strive to challenge, enrich and inspire the lives of both artist and audience. Our tagline is Authentic Lives; Authentic Works. To keep in the PGP loop, please click here to subscribe to Maryanne’s blog, Weekly Words of Wisdom.

 

published in Book Reviews, Change, Death, Grief, Inspiration, Life After Loss by Maryanne | August 7, 2018 | 4 Comments

Note: At the time of writing this blog (Aug 7th, 2018) Yosemite National Park is closed due to the Ferguson wildfire. Thousands of tourists have been evacuated and two firefighters have died. My thoughts & prayers go out to the family, friends and colleagues of the firefighters.

The Healing Power of Nature – Mountains of Light Book Review

 

“I want to simplify my life so that I’m not worn out and frustrated at the end of every workday. I want to move at a pace that helps me notice what is around me and gives me the chance to interact with it.”

– R. Mark Liebenow, Mountains of Light

Looking for a late-summer read?

I recently finished Mark Liebenow’s beautiful book, Mountains of Light; Seasons of Reflection in Yosemite. I have always wanted to visit Yosemite National Park. After reading Mark’s book, now I really want to go!

This non-fiction read is about Mark’s journey of coming to terms with the death of his wife, Evelyn. It is in nature – through repeated visits at different times of the year to Yosemite – where Mark finds peace with his wife’s passing.

This makes sense. In my experience, spending time in nature and/or with animals seem to be able to soothe chaotic thoughts and emotional turmoil like nothing else.

Here are a few snippets from Mountains of Light:

“I feel edgy and certain of my mortality. I came here wanting Yosemite to shake me out of my stupor and help me face death. And it has, but it feels like Yosemite wants to do this by having me listen to its stories.”

“Mark Twain regretted knowing what lay beneath the swells in the water as he learned to guide riverboats down the Mississippi River because he no longer saw its beauty.”

Part of me no longer cares why natural places affect me so deeply, and I’m not really concerned about what does or doesn’t have a soul. If I say that every part of creation reveals something about nature’s reality then I’m challenged to look at everything with respect and find insights…the wild outdoors simply inspire me.” 

Another observation that struck me about Mark’s book was the significant difference between how he chose to share his grief, through his story, and how I shared my experience with grief in my book, A Widow’s Awakening.

I’m not sure whether this is a gender thing or not i.e. do women tend to be more open than men about sharing the details of their emotional journey?

In A Widow’s Awakening, I yank the lid right off Pandora’s Box of Grief and let it ALL out: the devastation, the hurt, the hatred, self-pity, anger, jealousy, bitterness…the confusing thoughts, conflicting emotions and spiritual isolation.

To be honest, I haven’t read that many books about grief, so I found Mark’s candid but subtle journey intriguing. There was definitely a sense of inner struggle as he tried to come to peace with his wife’s passing but it was rather enlightening to read a personal memoir by an author who I suspect is an extremely private person. The depth of his loss and subsequent sorrow is immense; how he chose to communicate that loss to his reader was very different to my approach.

And that’s a good thing.

For everyone grieves differently. And different authors approach the same subject matter in their own unique way. And yet, despite our differences – as people, as writers – we are still able to find the common threads of love, loss, passion and peace.

“Evelyn’s presence is always with me, especially when I spend time at Happy Isles, her favourite place in the valley. I’m surrounded by the words of John Muir, as well as by owl and hawk, mountain lion and bear, raven and jay, coyote and ouzel, which often show up unexpectedly with surprising inflections of wisdom. I’ve finally accepted that death is a necessary part of life and that I have had to turn away from home and live in the backcountry of stone for a while to deal with my grief. In spring I think I will be ready to turn back toward life.”

R. Mark Liebenow

On a less personal but equally important note, I read Mountains of Light while writing the next draft of my screenplay, God’s Country, about Canadian-born silent screen star, Nell Shipman. Nell’s story is very much about her love of the natural world and wild animals. Mountains of Light was the perfect book to be reading while working on this script. I think we sometimes lose sight of how much wisdom the wilderness holds. And what we lose sight of, we risk losing.

I highly recommend reading this beautiful book.

Retriever not included in book giveaway 🙂

*Win a copy of Mountains of Light

If you would like chance to win a copy, please send us an e-mail by Aug 15th, with the subject line, “Mountains of Light,” and your name will be entered into the draw.

*Contest open to WWOW (Weekly Words of Wisdom) subscribers only. If you’re not a subscriber but would like to be 🙂 here is the link to sign up.

A Widow’s Awakening Novel Coming Sept 13th

Please visit BHC Press to pre-order.

Maryanne Pope is the author of A Widow’s Awakening, the playwright of Saviour and the screenwriter of God’s Country. Maryanne is CEO of Pink Gazelle Productions and Chair of the John Petropoulos Memorial Fund. If you would like to receive her regular weekly blog, please sign up here. As a thank you, you’ll receive a short but saucy e-book entitled, Dive into this Chicago Deep Dish – Ten Bite-Sized Steps for a Yummier Slice of Life.

 

 

published in Change, Charities, Giving, Landmines by Maryanne | July 9, 2018 | No Comment

Landmines Are STILL a Huge Problem – Be An Angel to HALO Trust

 

“Landmines do not care who they target. Woman, girl, man or boy, the impact they have transcends entire communities. Statistics show the risk of physical injury falls disproportionately on men and boys but women and girls are more vulnerable to the indirect impact of landmines — economically, socially and emotionally.”

– The HALO Trust

Do you remember that iconic photo of Princess Diana (above), of her walking through a mine field in Angola?

It was taken in 1997, eight months before she died.

Diana’s 1997 visit to Angola was extremely effective in terms of raising global awareness of the plight of landmine victims and the indiscriminate nature of the weapons. As you may recall, many countries came together later that year to sign the Mine Ban Treaty in Ottawa.

Despite the Treaty’s huge success in stopping landmine production and transfer, the HALO Trust, which is the world’s largest humanitarian mine clearance organisation, says the Treaty’s proposed 2025 deadline for a mine free world will not be met without a substantial increase in funding for mine clearance.

More than 20 years after Diana’s visit, landmines are still killing Angola’s children

The harsh reality is that mines and unexploded ordnance are still harming civilians and hindering development in Angola – and in 63 other countries and territories around the world.

Since Diana’s 1997 visit, the HALO Trust has destroyed more than 95,000 landmines in Angola, cleared 840 minefields, and disposed of 164,000 shells, missiles and bombs safely. There are 680 minefields remaining in the ten provinces where they work.

The minefield where Diana walked is now a thriving community with housing, a carpentry workshop, a small college and a school. But there is still much to be done. Most of the cities in Angola have been cleared but rural areas remain heavily mined and over 40% of the population lives in the countryside.

A sharp decline in international assistance has forced HALO to reduce its local demining teams from 1,200 personnel to just 250 in the last few years. Today, fleets of armoured vehicles and specialist equipment are inactive due to lack of funds. Hundreds of trained Angolan de-miners are now unemployed.

Meanwhile, estimates for the total number of casualties from landmines and explosive items in Angola vary considerably, from 23,000 to 80,000. The size of the country and length of its conflict have hindered efforts to keep reliable records.

The slow progress of Angola clearance contrasts with that of Mozambique, which was finally declared free of mines in 2015 after 22 years of work by HALO and other operators.

Angolan deminer Luciana

For more information, please visit the HALO Trust website.

What does it cost to clear a minefield? 

The cost of clearing a minefield varies depending on the size, geography, mine threat and local economy. On average, funding a team of deminers for a month starts at $5,000 and for a year can cost up to $100,000.

You can be an angel to HALO Trust

If you would like to make a donation to the Halo Trust, here is the link.

We will match your donation up to July 31st

If you do make a donation by July 31st, please e-mail us a copy of your donation receipt from HALO Trust and we will match it – up to a grand total of $1000 in donations.

On Twitter

To help spread the word on social media about the need for funding, please follow @TheHaloTrust.

Here is a hashtag to use:

#LandmineFree2025

On behalf of those impacted by the devastation of landmines, thank you for helping bring about a landmine-free world.

Maryanne Pope is the author of A Widow’s Awakening, the playwright of Saviour and the screenwriter of God’s Country. She is the executive producer of the documentary, Whatever Floats Your Boat…Perspectives on Motherhood. Maryanne is the CEO of Pink Gazelle Productions and Chair of the John Petropoulos Memorial Fund. If you would like to receive her weekly blog, please sign up here. Maryanne lives on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.